All Care Guides

Getting Your Cat Back on Its Feet

The most effective way to treat lameness is to obtain an accurate diagnosis of what is wrong. If your cat is limping, don’t try to guess what the problem is or wait to see if it gets better on its own. A veterinarian can evaluate your cat by a thorough physical examination; if necessary, laboratory tests can be performed and/or radiographs (x-rays) obtained. Lameness can be caused by many things—infections, fractures, soft tissue injuries, and arthritis, to name a few. Paying attention to signs that your cat is uncomfortable and having your cat evaluated quickly can help prevent smaller problems from becoming bigger ones.

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Getting a Pet Sitter

It’s important to have someone you trust care for your pet while you’re away. Keeping your pet at home in the care of a pet sitter will spare your pet the stress and health risks associated with boarding facilities. A pet sitter will not only feed and play with your pet but also water plants, bring in the mail, and take out the trash. Some sitters may also perform grooming or behavior training. A pet sitter can help your home appear to be lived in, which can deter burglars. If you don’t have a neighbor, friend, or relative who can care for your pet when you’re away, consider hiring a professional pet sitter. Knowing that your pet is being cared for by a professional pet sitter can add to your peace of mind while you’re away.

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Giardiasis

Giardiasis is a diarrheal disease that can affect many species, including dogs, cats, and humans. It is caused by Giardia, a single-celled parasite that attacks the gastrointestinal tract of infected animals. Among experts, there is some question about (1) the number of Giardia subtypes that can cause disease in animals and (2) the potential of these subtypes to also infect humans. While humans are susceptible to infection with Giardia, infection by the same subtypes prevalent in animals is thought to be exceedingly rare but remains a point of controversy and investigation.

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Glaucoma Testing

The structures inside the eye, such as the iris and lens, are surrounded by fluid. Normally, the movement of fluid through the eye is well controlled. However, sometimes the fluid doesn’t circulate normally, and fluid pressure builds up inside the eye. Glaucoma is the general term used to describe increased pressure inside the eye.

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Glucose and Fructosamine Testing

In diabetic patients, spot-checking the blood glucose (or blood sugar) is a quick and direct way to tell what the level is. The rapid result permits quick detection and management of a dangerously low or an extremely high level. However, blood glucose testing provides only a “snapshot” of the total blood glucose “picture.” The test result does not indicate what the blood glucose level will be 2 hours later, 8 hours later, or the next day. Your veterinarian needs to do other testing to obtain this information.

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